Research

Nursing

Researcher: Dr Zandile Gumede

Designation: UKZN Lecturer,

Study: Analysing the Health Behaviour of Children from Child-Headed Households in a Selected Health District in KZN, an Ethnographic Study

Summary: The study aimed to produce a broad picture about the health behaviour of children in child-headed households (CHHs) and issues surrounding their access to health care services.

The study highlights an anomaly in present legislation whereby the definition of a ‘child is a person below the age of 18 years’, while in a case of a child-headed household a person as young as 12 years is awarded the status of being the head of the family.

The study was conducted using a qualitative approach, ethnographic design and constructionist paradigms.  Observation, unstructured interviews and focus group interviews were used for purposive sampling and data collection.

The research covered areas not dealt with previously such as the critical issue of accessing health care services and inherent barriers to it.


Researcher: Dr Margaret Orton
Designation: Occupational Health Nurse
Study: Access to Higher Education in the Health Sciences – a Policy Implementation Analysis
Summary: The study investigated access to higher education in health sciences with a focus on transformation and social justice.
It looked at how SA government implemented its various policies at eight SA universities which have medical schools. 
The research highlighted that access to higher education was complex and involved more than just admission. In the context of transformation and social justice, achieving equity of access for success was multi-factorial and had diverse and complex challenges.

Researcher: Dr Margaret Orton

Designation: Occupational Health Nurse

Study: Access to Higher Education in the Health Sciences – a Policy Implementation Analysis

Summary: The study investigated access to higher education in health sciences with a focus on transformation and social justice.

It looked at how SA government implemented its various policies at eight SA universities which have medical schools.

The research highlighted that access to higher education was complex and involved more than just admission. In the context of transformation and social justice, achieving equity of access for success was multi-factorial and had diverse and complex challenges.

 

Researcher: Dr Eleazar Ndabarora

Designation:  Post Grad

Study: Developing an Intervention Model for Data Quality Management and Health Information Use at Community and District Levels in Rwanda

Summary: The study aim was to ensure that reported outcomes of implemented health programmes in Rwanda and similar resources-limited settings correctly reflect what the situation is.

The study involved Health Data Quality Management and the use of Health Information at community and district levels in Rwanda and similar resources-limited contexts.

It examined the systematic review of health data quality management and best practices at community and district levels in lower and middle income countries and evaluated the quality of clinical and community-based health programme data across different levels of health systems, community health worker-managed data, health centres and district hospitals.

The study also evaluated the use of available health information for daily decision-making processes in health care delivery, monitoring and evaluation of clinical and community health programmes; and proposed an intervention model that could assist different stakeholders involved in managing health data and ensure the use of reliable information for better decisions in delivering health services.



Researcher: Dr Eleazar Ndabarora

Designation: Post Grad

Study: Factors that influence utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among university students residing at a selected university campus

Summary: Abstract Various studies have reported that university students, who are mostly young people, rarely use existing HIV/AIDS preventive methods. Although studies have shown that young university students have a high degree of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and HIV modes of transmission, they are still not utilising the existing HIV prevention methods and still engage in risky sexual practices favourable to HIV. Some variables, such as awareness of existing HIV/AIDS prevention methods, have been associated with utilisation of such methods. The study aimed to explore factors that influence use of existing HIV/AIDS prevention methods among university students residing in a selected campus, using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework. A quantitative research approach and an exploratory-descriptive design were used to describe perceived factors that influence utilisation by university students of HIV/AIDS prevention methods. A total of 335 students completed online and manual questionnaires. Study findings showed that the factors which influenced utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods were mainly determined by awareness of the existing university-based HIV/AIDS prevention strategies. Most utilised prevention methods were voluntary counselling and testing services and free condoms. Perceived susceptibility and perceived threat of HIV/AIDS score was also found to correlate with HIV risk index score. Perceived susceptibility and perceived threat of HIV/AIDS showed correlation with self-efficacy on condoms and their utilisation. Most HBM variables were not predictors of utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among students. Intervention aiming to improve the utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among students at the selected university should focus on removing identified barriers, promoting HIV/AIDS prevention services and providing appropriate resources to implement such programmes.



Researcher: Dr Eleazar Ndabarora

Designation: Post Grad

Study: Systematic Review of Health Data Quality Management and Best Practices at Community and District Levels in Low and Middle Income Countries

Summary: Research findings have reported lack of reliable health data and poor management for district health information systems in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). This paper aims to review the literature on problems with health data quality management and health information evidences and evidences of best practices and use at community and district levels in LMIC, with a view to making recommendations for future research. Research citations, conference proceedings and diseases surveillance reports from 2000–2011 were accessed in PubMed, Medline, LISTA (EBSCO), CINAHL, Cochrane, and Google. Relevant studies were selected, the methodologies critiqued and synthesized. The researchers accessed 1383, and 38 were reviewed by three reviewers. Poor quality health data, low level of health information use, and poor management of health information systems were found. These findings hinder evidence-based decisions based and planning at community and district levels in LMIC. Though poor practices were found, improved health care services delivery with improved health data efficiency was found to be possible.



Researcher: Nelouise Geyer

Designation: Nursing Education Association

Study: The Influence of Intrapersonal Characteristics of Individual Nurses on their Work Performance: A Predictive Correlational Study in a Selected Province in South Africa

Summary: The study examines the influence of a group of interpersonal characteristics on the work performance and caring behaviour of professional nurses from the perspective of both nurses and patients.

A quantitative, cross-sectional survey, predictive, correlation model-testing design with multi-layered and stratified sampling was used to describe the influence of nurses’ intrapersonal characteristics on their work performance and caring behaviour.

 

The study was conducted on nurses working in medical and surgical wards in public and private hospitals. A self-report questionnaire used for completion by nurses included instruments on nurses’ work performance, professional values, emotional intelligence, core self-evaluations (personality), empathy and job involvement.

Patients were invited to complete a questionnaire about their perceptions of the caring behaviour of nurses.  Descriptive and inferential statistics were generated.

The results generated through structural equation modelling indicated that the professional values of nurses had a statistically significant positive relationship with all dimensions of nurses’ work performance and caring behaviour.

While some of the other selected intrapersonal characteristics had statistically significant relationships, effect sizes were small, making them not practically important.



Researcher: Dr Isioma Mary Ofili.

Designation: Student

Study: An Ethnographic Study of Predictors of Hypertension and its Preventive Strategies in a Rural Community in Delta State, Nigeria

Summary: The study investigated the blood pressure profiles of residents in Ibusa community in Delta State Nigeria. It established predictors of hypertension in the community.

The study also explored traditional and cultural practices associated with hypertension management, with the aim being to develop guidelines for management of hypertension through a “System Support Strategy”, combining appropriate and effective clinical care with community action, and taking into account facilities and social and environmental factors influencing the development of hypertension in rural settings.

The community-based study was conducted in three phases and has produced four articles.

The research identified hypertension risk (predisposing) factors in the studied community and formed the basis for specific health education programmes in the community as well as for implementing preventive interventions in a culturally sensitive and situation specific manner.



Researcher: Nonzwakazi Ntombela

Designation: Student

Study: Soil Transmitted Helminths and Schistosomiasis

Summary: The study examined soil transmitted helminths (intestinal parasites) and schistosomiasis infections in pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics around Durban.

 

The study was a descriptive cross sectional study undertaken at two clinics. The aims were to assess the prevalence, intensity, species and risk factors for infection in pregnant women.

The research found a high prevalence of infection in pregnant women.

The findings called for urgent attention to reduce maternal and child complications related to parasite infections.

These include several complications such as but not limited to; low birth weight babies, iron deficiency anaemia and lowered efficacy of treatment against TB and HIV and thus faster progression of the diseases.



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